Free Family Event: A Harp Quartet, Coloring and Cocktails

I live for finding free family events for my family. And when the event includes an opportunity for a musical exposure – the better!


The group Les Delices, directed by Debra Nagy performed at the Cleveland Bop Stop to an audience of children aged 5 to 12. Monthly, the Cleveland Bop Stop offers several musical events for children during the day. By night they are a full fledged jazz club where every cocktail purchased goes towards funding their musical education department.

Angelic harp coloring sheets


The setting for the event included several small round tables outlining the stage. On each table were unique coloring sheets that included a few pictures of the Harp’s past history: The Pharaoh, and angelic angles. While we colored Les Delices (a quartet of piccolo, violin, cello and harp) played several delightful songs including a silly story of the mouse and the frog led by vocalist Debra Nagy.

Les Delices performing at the Bop Stop


Should you find yourselves thirsty or hungry during these events, the Bop Stop offers a small appetizer menu such as ranch popcorn and flatbread pizza to name a few. Parents can sip on wine, beer, and other cocktail favorites.

To our surprise, we were pleased to find out Les Delices gives free family musical events and paid performances throughout the year! If you would like to go to one of Les Delices events, or visit The Bop Stop for a family/adult jazz event, check out the links below for more information:

View Les Delices live performance here:

Les Delices:

The Bop Stop Calendar:

Outside the Bop Stop

Seeking Your Ancestry? Give these websites and ideas a try!

Our life experience here, in this moment, is so precious. Who we are now and will become is full of so much history. The wise words and knowledge spoken upon our lips, may have, at some point, been a distance memory spoken from a grandmother, or grandfather – who heard it from their mother – who heard it from their mother, and so forth.

 Have you ever stared into an old black and white photo of a relative imagining what was going on for them? Wondered if their struggles, hopes and desires were similar to the thoughts you have today? How they overcame so much, with so much less than what we have offered to us today? Just what was their story and how did they get there?


This is you! Your ancestors have spoken and want so much to share with you their past – And how you became uniquely you.

How do you have that amazing drive and courage? How do you cook such delicious award winning dishes? How do you draw the finest of fine art that could be hung and sold for thousands in a gallery? How are you…You?

If you have ever considered wanting to know more about your family history, here are some ideas that you can do now to get started:



Start recording questions you want answered from your oldest living relative:

They are the closest link to your past that you can get. Go spend an afternoon asking for family names and what times were like for them. Typically, their grandparent’s name will give you a great leap into the past. Jot down as many names as they can give you. This will help in locating your relatives when doing a search.

Take the names gathered and start searching:

The Ancestry DNA kit is great for those serious searchers looking for more precise linkage to what there blood line is.

You can use awesome websites such as (more listed below) and pay a minimal membership fee depending on the level that you want to take it to. also does DNA testing of your saliva (I am excitedly awaiting my results), for $99. Within 7 to 8 weeks they will pinpoint exactly what country or region your family originated from. Combine that with the information from your older relatives and you have a great start in digging into your past.

The old school way:

Another way to search is through the library of records in the city that most of your relatives were born in. Every city keeps a record of live births and deaths. Depending on the city though many slaves were sold off and were only accounted for in their slave masters property records (see below for a website specifically for African Americans). Talking with a Historian once you have a few names to search under will be of great help.

A few website recommendations:


Google FREE

Most people love and use Google because it gives you such a large database to search for places, names and can guide you to the perfect family history search engine tools. Google has a variety of other tools that you can utilize to help you such as, Google Maps and Google Earth. Both searches can help you locate ancestral addresses. Google Translate can help you translate text from other languages, and Google Books incorporates an online library of out-of-print resources that may contain local histories and compiled genealogies.

RootsWeb World Connect FREE

How cool would it be to have others (including researchers) share and provide helpful tips and clues to add to your growing family tree? Well that’s exactly what you can do on the RootsWeb website. Information can be updated or removed at any time and although the findings may not be 100% accurate, it truly increases your chances! Don’t know exactly where to start? You can browse their database that is full of over half a billion names with over 400,000 family trees!

AfriGeneas FREE

A phenomenal website providing a unique slave database of research and education for those researching their African-American roots. Most records for slaves were kept by the slave owners and are generally the only clue most African Americans have in tracing their ancestry. AfriGeneas site allows for an ample forum to communicate with other users searching into their African American genealogy.

So what are you waiting for? This weekend go spend an afternoon drinking tea digging through old photos, reminiscing of old times past and learning new things about your family history. After all, in this circle of life, one day you will be the relative the family goes to, to find out more about where they came from. Or, maybe you will be the one in the photo, long gone, standing proud as your loved one stares and admires just who you were and where you came from.



Experience a Native American Pow Wow in your State


Grab your family, pack up the van and head on out for a taste of history you can’t find in the school books. If you ever wanted to experience a Native American Pow Wow, keep reading to find out where you can find one, and just what exactly a Pow Wow is.

As summertime pours in, the search for unique experiences for my family within my home state of Ohio continues. In fact, I encourage you to do the same within your home state for numerous reasons.

For one, you can save time and money on traveling expenses. Next, you get to see how awesome and unique your State truly is when you venture beyond the cracks and crevices of your city.

Finally, the chance to experience something new should never be put on hold. Many times we stay stagnant in our city because we are comfortable with the familiar. Or, you could also be saving up for the perfect trip out of state and/or to get out of the country. In the meantime, let the hidden jewels within your state and outside your city tie your family over until the next big adventure!

In a conversation with a friend, she explained how (on a summers eve zip lining a few years ago near (Hocking Hills, Ohio) she heard enchanting drums and bells bellowing throughout the air. To her surprise she was told a Native American Pow Wow was in full action. Although she didn’t finish her zip lining in time to go, it definitely piqued my interest to find out more.

I began to search Pow Wow’s in the State of Ohio and came across a plethora of information. The vastest website pertaining to this gathering was called Pow Within the site you can find a monthly Pow Wow event going on in states all across America. Some more elaborate and others more intimate like the one that my family attended in June, at Baby Bison Ranch in Cadiz, Ohio.

This particular Pow Wow was special for my family because of the close proximity it was to where my mother was born in Smithfield, Ohio. We have been told that my grandmother’s side of the family carried Cherokee Indian by way of Oklahoma. Most of my mother’s family have moved away from Smithfield. However, we had been planning to visit my Uncle who has a beautiful home with a scenery of land for miles. The combination of the two events created the perfect opportunity to discover what this gathering was all about.

As we began our journey, the scenic rolling hills and desolate winding roads gave way to hot summer sun that tanned all our skin. Anxious for the adventure, my family and I reached our long awaited event.

This precious girl in the white cap welcomed my family to her family’s ranch. She was a Cherokee Indian.


As we walked through the gates, somewhat unsure of what we were stepping into, we were kindly greeted by a young girl, age 11, eager to welcome us and explain the sacred grounds that we stood on.

She explained that her great grandmother, a full Cherokee Indian owned Boss Bison Ranch. They were honored to be able to throw this tradition annually and welcome new faces who know little or a lot about their culture. We were warmed to be told that All were welcome.

For admittance to the event they required one canned good per person which would be given to local charities in the area.

Beautiful garb and colors adorn the Native Americans as they began their sacred dance.


As soon as we walked through the gates, we were met with lively colors, the rumble of the drums, and a sacred dance began. We took our seats on barrels of hay around the grassy dirt dance floor.

Plenty of beautiful energy stones to choose from.


Around the perimeter of the Pow Wow were Native American Vendors who we quickly learned were friendly and a wealth of information. Although our attention was easily diverted to the beautiful jewelry, stones, herbs and oils that lie on the table, we soon realized how diverse the Native American’s there were. There were various shades of dark, brown and white skin tribes in attendance. Some had blond hair and blue eyes while others were black with dark brown or black hair. This was a discovery that most school history books have rarely shared. Here is my husband’s take on a conversation with a vendor:

A history lesson from a man that called himself a White Indian.

“I was told there was a lot of diversity in the Native American background particularly in Ohio. In speaking with a White Native (what he considered himself to be) American vendor that the Woodland Indians were known for capturing black runaway slaves and white women during battle. They would then take them back to their tribe and the elder mothers of the tribe would then decide if they could be adopted into their society to live side by side and learn their culture and their ways. Once one (white or black) was adopted into the tribe they virtually never wanted to leave because they were considered free.”



My brother-in-law made a new friend. We all did that day.


As hard as it was for us to pull away from this event, what we took home with us that day was invaluable. The most memorable moment of the entire experience was removing the misconceptions I had been taught in the past about the culture and how welcoming the Native Americans were from the moment we stepped into the Pow Wow until the moment we left. To find a Pow Wow near you visit


Someone had a real wolf as a pet. He was chained up nice and tight though.

pow wolf