Experience a Native American Pow Wow in your State

POW JAIA

Grab your family, pack up the van and head on out for a taste of history you can’t find in the school books. If you ever wanted to experience a Native American Pow Wow, keep reading to find out where you can find one, and just what exactly a Pow Wow is.

As summertime pours in, the search for unique experiences for my family within my home state of Ohio continues. In fact, I encourage you to do the same within your home state for numerous reasons.

For one, you can save time and money on traveling expenses. Next, you get to see how awesome and unique your State truly is when you venture beyond the cracks and crevices of your city.

Finally, the chance to experience something new should never be put on hold. Many times we stay stagnant in our city because we are comfortable with the familiar. Or, you could also be saving up for the perfect trip out of state and/or to get out of the country. In the meantime, let the hidden jewels within your state and outside your city tie your family over until the next big adventure!

In a conversation with a friend, she explained how (on a summers eve zip lining a few years ago near (Hocking Hills, Ohio) she heard enchanting drums and bells bellowing throughout the air. To her surprise she was told a Native American Pow Wow was in full action. Although she didn’t finish her zip lining in time to go, it definitely piqued my interest to find out more.

I began to search Pow Wow’s in the State of Ohio and came across a plethora of information. The vastest website pertaining to this gathering was called Pow Wows.com. Within the site you can find a monthly Pow Wow event going on in states all across America. Some more elaborate and others more intimate like the one that my family attended in June, at Baby Bison Ranch in Cadiz, Ohio.

This particular Pow Wow was special for my family because of the close proximity it was to where my mother was born in Smithfield, Ohio. We have been told that my grandmother’s side of the family carried Cherokee Indian by way of Oklahoma. Most of my mother’s family have moved away from Smithfield. However, we had been planning to visit my Uncle who has a beautiful home with a scenery of land for miles. The combination of the two events created the perfect opportunity to discover what this gathering was all about.

As we began our journey, the scenic rolling hills and desolate winding roads gave way to hot summer sun that tanned all our skin. Anxious for the adventure, my family and I reached our long awaited event.

This precious girl in the white cap welcomed my family to her family’s ranch. She was a Cherokee Indian.

POW GIRL

As we walked through the gates, somewhat unsure of what we were stepping into, we were kindly greeted by a young girl, age 11, eager to welcome us and explain the sacred grounds that we stood on.

She explained that her great grandmother, a full Cherokee Indian owned Boss Bison Ranch. They were honored to be able to throw this tradition annually and welcome new faces who know little or a lot about their culture. We were warmed to be told that All were welcome.

For admittance to the event they required one canned good per person which would be given to local charities in the area.

Beautiful garb and colors adorn the Native Americans as they began their sacred dance.

POW DANCE

As soon as we walked through the gates, we were met with lively colors, the rumble of the drums, and a sacred dance began. We took our seats on barrels of hay around the grassy dirt dance floor.

Plenty of beautiful energy stones to choose from.

POW ROCKS

Around the perimeter of the Pow Wow were Native American Vendors who we quickly learned were friendly and a wealth of information. Although our attention was easily diverted to the beautiful jewelry, stones, herbs and oils that lie on the table, we soon realized how diverse the Native American’s there were. There were various shades of dark, brown and white skin tribes in attendance. Some had blond hair and blue eyes while others were black with dark brown or black hair. This was a discovery that most school history books have rarely shared. Here is my husband’s take on a conversation with a vendor:

A history lesson from a man that called himself a White Indian.

“I was told there was a lot of diversity in the Native American background particularly in Ohio. In speaking with a White Native (what he considered himself to be) American vendor that the Woodland Indians were known for capturing black runaway slaves and white women during battle. They would then take them back to their tribe and the elder mothers of the tribe would then decide if they could be adopted into their society to live side by side and learn their culture and their ways. Once one (white or black) was adopted into the tribe they virtually never wanted to leave because they were considered free.”

POW MAN

 

My brother-in-law made a new friend. We all did that day.

POW MIKE

As hard as it was for us to pull away from this event, what we took home with us that day was invaluable. The most memorable moment of the entire experience was removing the misconceptions I had been taught in the past about the culture and how welcoming the Native Americans were from the moment we stepped into the Pow Wow until the moment we left. To find a Pow Wow near you visit www.powwows.com

 

Someone had a real wolf as a pet. He was chained up nice and tight though.

pow wolf